Factory farms threaten our lakes

In Wisconsin, we’ve got the most beautiful lakes in the country. They’re where we take our families on vacation, or where we get away for the weekend. But too often we’ve found lakes and streams that are suffering from pollution, covered with algae or choked with weeds.

One of the main culprits is pollution from factory farms

Industrial farms sit right next to our waterways, and they’re growing in number. These farms produce millions of pounds of manure, which pollute our lakes.

These industrial farms are threatening our lakes. Yet the state is letting more and more of them set up shop in Wisconsin, increasing the amount of pollution to our waterways.

As much waste as 8.6 million people

Cows on industrial factory farms in Wisconsin create as much untreated waste as 8.6 million people each year. That’s more than one and a half times the population of our state. And far too much of this animal waste ends up as runoff pollution in our lakes, where it causes algae blooms and makes our lakes unfit for fishing, swimming or other activities.

To make matters worse, the number of factory farms in Wisconsin has nearly doubled in the last eight years, greatly increasing the amount of pollution.

Stop factory farm pollution

Continued factory farm pollution in Wisconsin will mean more algae blooms, more out-of-control weed growth, and more ruined lakes. This is simply unacceptable. This problem will only get worse unless we stop it now. That’s why Wisconsin Environment is urging the state to declare a moratorium on new factory farms.

Together, we can win

Your support makes it possible for our staff to make our case to the media, testify in Madison, and persuade decision-makers to support key lakes protections.

By taking action online, you can show state leaders that the public overwhelmingly supports strong protections on runoff pollution for our lakes.

 

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