Factory farms threaten our lakes

In Wisconsin, we’ve got the most beautiful lakes in the country. They’re where we take our families on vacation, or where we get away for the weekend. But too often we’ve found lakes and streams that are suffering from pollution, covered with algae or choked with weeds.

One of the main culprits is pollution from factory farms

Industrial farms sit right next to our waterways, and they’re growing in number. These farms produce millions of pounds of manure, which pollute our lakes.

These industrial farms are threatening our lakes. Yet the state is letting more and more of them set up shop in Wisconsin, increasing the amount of pollution to our waterways.

As much waste as 8.6 million people

Cows on industrial factory farms in Wisconsin create as much untreated waste as 8.6 million people each year. That’s more than one and a half times the population of our state. And far too much of this animal waste ends up as runoff pollution in our lakes, where it causes algae blooms and makes our lakes unfit for fishing, swimming or other activities.

To make matters worse, the number of factory farms in Wisconsin has nearly doubled in the last eight years, greatly increasing the amount of pollution.

Stop factory farm pollution

Continued factory farm pollution in Wisconsin will mean more algae blooms, more out-of-control weed growth, and more ruined lakes. This is simply unacceptable. This problem will only get worse unless we stop it now. That’s why Wisconsin Environment is urging the state to declare a moratorium on new factory farms.

Together, we can win

Your support makes it possible for our staff to make our case to the media, testify in Madison, and persuade decision-makers to support key lakes protections.

By taking action online, you can show state leaders that the public overwhelmingly supports strong protections on runoff pollution for our lakes.

 

Clean water updates

News Release | Wisconsin Environment

EPA Proposes Biggest Step for Clean Water in a Decade

Madison, WI - Today, in the biggest step forward for clean water in more than a decade, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed a rule to close loopholes in the Clean Water Act that leave 53% of Wisconsin’s streams and millions of acres of wetlands at risk of unchecked pollution and development. 

> Keep Reading
News Release | Wisconsin Environment

Report Connects Political Influence of Big Ag with Polluted Waterways in Wisconsin

Madison, WI – As more and more of Wisconsin’s lakes suffer from pollution at the hands of industrial agriculture, a new report by Wisconsin Environment Research & Policy Center reveals the political influence of the agribusiness lobby and its role in weakening Wisconsin’s clean water protections. In the last decade, the number of permitted factory farms in Wisconsin has more than doubled, and the agencies charged with enforcing the state’s clean water standards have allowed for the rapid growth of industrial farming.

 

> Keep Reading
Report | Wisconsin Environment Research & Policy Center

The Power to Pollute

Factory farms are polluting Wisconsin’s treasured waterways. Runoff laced with pollution from animal manure contaminates the state’s lakes and rivers, and the number of factory farms in the state is rapidly increasing. The agencies charged with keeping Wisconsin’s water clean have issued more and more water permits to industrial farming operations every year, even though livestock operations have already polluted thousands of acres of lakes and hundreds of miles of rivers.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Wisconsin Environment

Wisconsin Environment Applauds Nomination of Gina McCarthy for EPA Administrator

Madison, WI — Today, President Obama nominated Gina McCarthy for the next administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, replacing outgoing Administrator Lisa Jackson. McCarthy is currently the assistant administrator for the Office of Air and Radiation at the EPA, and previously held top environmental positions in Massachusetts and Connecticut. Megan Severson, state advocate for Wisconsin Environment, issued the following statement in response:

> Keep Reading

Pages

View AllRSS Feed