Result

Limits on runoff pollution passed.

Wisconsin’s lakes and streams define our state, and our waters are one step closer to safety, thanks to the efforts of our staff and members. In 2008 and 2010, we won strong rules to limit runoff from flowing into our lakes. Now, we're campaigning to make sure these critical limits are enforced.

Result

At 54.5 mpg, a big step forward for clean cars.

On July 29th, 2011, President Obama announced the outline of new clean car standards covering cars and light trucks through 2025. The new standards will require new cars to achieve a fleet average of 54.5 miles per galllon, which will amount to the single biggest step this country has ever taken to end our addiction to oil and tackle global warming. Thousands of our members helped seal the deal by emailing the White House and attending EPA hearings in support of the standards.

Result

Attacks on public health defeated—for now.

The coal lobby and their allies are trying to block the EPA from protecting public health, but we’ve held the line against some of their worst attacks: In March 2011, the U.S. Senate rejected a bill that would have blocked standards for soot, mercury and carbon pollution. And in April 2011, the Senate defeated four more bills that would have blocked the EPA from cutting air pollution. We need your help to keep up the fight.

Result

One step closer to a clean energy economy.

Wisconsin is getting closer than ever before to a clean energy economy. Our tireless advocacy and organizing helped pass a renewable energy standard in Wisconsin, which requires the state to get 10% of its energy from renewable sources by 2015. Since then, Wisconsin has recieved national attention for our renewable energy industry. President Obama even visited Wisconsin to highlight clean energy companies immediately after his 2011 state of the union address.

Result

Mercury pollution from power plants cut by 90%.

Our waterways are better protected from mercury pollution after we won a state policy to reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants by 90 percent. This is great news for Wisconsin's families, given mercury's toxic effects on how our kids think, learn and behave.  Since then, we’ve kept the pressure on by researching and publicizing the plants’ progress. And Wisconsin's limits on mercury pollution provided the basis for the first-ever nationwide standards on mercury emissions from power plants, which the EPA proposed in 2011. 

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