Wisconsin Environment Latest Blog Posts

Cities and towns of all sizes are driving the transition to solar energy.

According to the White House, President Trump’s State of the Union address will discuss the challenges of the coming year in an optimistic, forward-looking and bipartisan manner. We support that notion wholeheartedly, but we’re also mindful of his past rhetoric.

As if it wasn’t already clear, 2017 provided much more evidence that we are changing our planet in dangerous ways. The average temperature across Wisconsin was 2.925°F warmer than normal – making it one of the four warmest years in Wisconsin state history.

Two years ago this very day, the United States reached an historic international agreement in Paris committing to address the global threat of climate change with nearly 200 hundred nations. In 2015, the United States was one of the biggest players in the room. Fast-forward to today, and the picture looks quite different. We are the odd one out — the only nation on the planet now stepping away from this critical global action.

In 1908, Henry Ford introduced the Model T. Suddenly, affordable, mass-produced, internal combustion engine cars were within the financial reach of Americans.

Another quarter down, another solar record set. According to the latest figures from GTM Research and the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA), solar had its best second quarter in history. Below, I’ve selected three key stats that I think best help to explain their findings, and the state of solar overall.

Friday morning at 5 a.m. The sky is dark, but the roads are clear and I’m just a few miles away from my AirBnb in Murfreesboro, Tennessee — valuables, pup and nourishment in tow. After 18 hours of driving, I’m exhausted but grateful to be out of harm’s way.

For those of us on the Environment America clean energy team, the solar eclipse is a powerful reminder of the progress solar energy has made, and how much further we need to go. When the last solar eclipse occurred 38 years ago, solar panels were niche products, and electricity generated from the sun made up a negligible piece of our electrical grid.

Ten short years ago, solar panels were mere novelties. Today, they’re a dominant force in America’s energy landscape, and poised for even more growth in the years ahead. Coupled with huge advances in wind energy, battery storage, electric vehicles and energy efficiency, it’s getting clearer than ever that moving to a future powered entirely by clean, renewable energy is as feasible at it is necessary.