Report | Wisconsin Environment Research and Policy Center

Charging Forward

For decades, driving a car has meant consuming oil. Today, drivers finally have a choice. Thanks in part to smart policies adopted by states across the country and by the Obama administration, every major automobile manufacturer is offering a new plug-in vehicle powered primarily by electricity. Environment America’s new report, Charging Forward: The Emergence of Electric Vehicles and Their Role in Reducing Oil Consumption, has now found that in just three years, these vehicles could reduce our country’s global warming pollution by about 630,000 metric tons annually--or far more if we continue to work toward a clean energy future. It's time to plug in, power up, and protect our planet, because electric vehicles have arrived.

Report | Wisconsin Environment Research & Policy Center

Building a Better America

We can save money and help solve global warming by reducing the amount of energy we use, including in the buildings where we live and work every day. More than 40 percent of our energy — and 10 percent of all the energy used in the world — goes toward powering America’s buildings. But today’s high-efficiency homes and buildings prove that we have the technology and skills to drastically improve the efficiency of
our buildings while simultaneously improving their comfort and affordability.

Report | Wisconsin Environment Research & Policy Center

Gobbling Less Gas for Thanksgiving: How Clean Cars Will Cut Oil Use and Save Americans Money

America’s dependence on oil threatens our environment, our economy, and our national security. Whether it is the scars left by the oil spills in the Yellowstone and Kalamazoo rivers and the Gulf of Mexico, the $1 billion that American families and businesses send overseas every day for oil, or the nearly 2 billion metric tons of global warming pollution emitted annually which fuels more and more extreme weather, these problems demand that we break our dependence on oil.  

Report | Wisconsin Environment Research & Policy Center

Wisconsin's Biggest Mercury Polluters

Power plants continue to release large amounts of toxic pollutants, including mercury, into our air. In 2010, two-thirds of all airborne mercury pollution in the United States came from the smokestacks of coal-fired power plants. In other words, power plants generate more airborne mercury pollution than all other industrial sources combined.

Mercury is a potent neurotoxicant. Mercury exposure during critical periods of brain development can contribute to irreversible deficits in verbal skills, damage to attention and motor control, and reduced IQ.

In 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the first national standards limiting mercury and other toxic air pollution from existing coal- and oil-fired power plants. Implementing these standards will protect public health.

Report | Wisconsin Environment Research & Policy Center

Danger In the Air

Milwaukee, Wisconsin - Today Wisconsin Environment released a new report showing that 3 metropolitan areas in Wisconsin – Kenosha, Sheboygan and Racine – are among the top ten smoggiest small metropolitan areas in the country. Smog is a harmful air pollutant that leads to asthma attacks and exacerbates respiratory illnesses, especially among children and the elderly. The new report, Danger in the Air: Unhealthy Air Days in 2010 and 2011, also found that there were 11 days in 2010 in Wisconsin when at least part of the state experienced smog levels exceeding the national health standard. Also, this summer, residents in the Milwaukee area were alerted to unhealthy air on 4 days.

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